On the wearing of the green

It is interesting to note that green was an expensive color until the advent of synthetic dyes. There are natural dye sources that dye greenish but none that truly make a green. Instead you have to dye the yarn or fabric twice – once in indigo/woad and once or twice in yellow. Since indigo based dyes sit on the fiber and are not chemically bonded the same way most dyes are, it is tricky to know what order to dye. Do you potentially contaminate the indigo bath with yellow fabric or do you dye blue first and then dye it yellow? It is an interesting problem. I have found that dyeing blue over the yellow creates a blue fabric. Dyeing yellow over the blue I think dyes the indigo particles and thus yields a better green.

Teaser. Or what I am dyeing for.

I have added indigo dyed fat quarters to my Etsy store. But the response has been lukewarm. I don’t think I am promoting them enough. I think folks are waiting to see what other colors I pull out of my dye pot. So here is a teaser of what I have been dyeing.

I use Kona Cotton fabric as that is what quilters tell me they like. The picture below is my semi-solids. The dyes were a combination of indigo and weld, madder, weld and indigo.

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Next is shibori patterned using Pomegranate rinds.

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And finally, my favorite, shibori with madder.

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I am thinking of putting these into bundles of 6 fat quarters. I am still trying to decide on a price. Any ideas out there?

Winterfair 2012 Wrapup

Winterfair Columbus 2012 was my first real show. As a newbie I had a lot to learn and still do! Since this was my first show I was lucky to break even, especially since the number of attendees was lower due to good weather.

I have to thank my husband, Bob, and my daughter, Maggie, for all of their help getting things ready, setting up/tear down and encouragement. A big thank you to my friend, Michelle, who first suggested I apply to Winterfair and then helped work my booth Friday and Saturday. And yo Kim and Constance for sharing their experience. And another big thank you to my fellow vendor, Mikelle Hickman-Romine, who was great at keeping my spirits up and completely redesigning my booth. She is also a fantastic jewelry artist and you should totally check her out!

Booth AFTER Redesign

Booth AFTER Redesign

Here are some if the things I learned:

Budget early and expect to spend more. There is always something else you are going to need at the last minute. Plus supplies to make 200 scarves are not cheap! And budget your time as well. Life happens and will put you behind where you want to be.

Plan your lighting. It is a good idea to do a dry run and set up your booth with lighting to know the length of the extension cords needed. And buy cool, color-corrected light bulbs. It makes a difference in the colors in your booth.

Weather is something you can plan for but not control. Hope for cold, clear days for a winter show. We had 60 degrees in December which reduced traffic by a large factor. People were putting up lights instead of shopping.

Have something small and inexpensive in your booth. I did not and that reduced the amount of traffic I had. I am adding some hair clips to my product line, made from shibori-dyed ribbon. Hopefully that will help.

Hair Flower Clip

Hair Flower Clip

Customers don’t like white walls. We redesigned my booth Saturday evening to change the heights of my racks and cover as much of the walls as possible. The result was more traffic on Sunday.

Food and water will be waaaaay overpriced. Bring as much as you can. I had a hungry teenager helping me and I swear I spent more feeding her than I made!

iPad and the Square Register app is the bomb. Really. It makes it easy to make buttons for your products and discounts so all you have to do is click. I am giving serious consideration to an iPad Mini with a data plan for next year.

Don’t expect to make a profit your first show. You will have a lot of expenses to recoup and breaking even is an accomplishment. I about broke even. Shows in the future will be easier to profit from (in theory) as I will not have as much investment needed aside from booth fees, supplies and travel expenses.

I broke even. That was an accomplishment. And I reached my dream of being an artisan at a major venue. So there is that. While I was a bit disappointed at first, I realized that both accomplishments are something to be proud of.